Solved: java get class by string

get class by string In the world of programming, solving problems efficiently and effectively is crucial for any developer. One such problem that often arises in Java development is obtaining a class by its string name. This article aims to provide a comprehensive solution to this problem and delve into the various libraries and functions involved in addressing it. Let’s begin by understanding the context in which this problem generally occurs.

Java developers often face situations where they need to work with classes whose names are provided as strings. The most common use-case is when creating instances of a class dynamically during runtime. Knowing how to work with strings and convert them into a class is an essential skill for any developer working with Java.

Java Reflection

To solve this problem, Java provides a powerful feature called Reflection. Reflection allows inspecting and interacting with classes, interfaces, fields, and methods at runtime. It enables developers to create instances of a class, invoke methods, get or set the values of fields, and more – all based on the string representation of the class’s name.

Getting a Class by String Name

Now let’s explore the solution to the problem of getting a class by its string name. We’ll use the Class.forName() method, which is part of the Java Reflection API.

public class GetClassFromString {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            String className = "java.util.ArrayList";
            Class<?> clazz = Class.forName(className);
            System.out.println("Class: " + clazz.getName());
        } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

In this code example, we’ve created a string variable called className and assigned it the value “java.util.ArrayList”. Next, we use the Class.forName() method, which takes the string className as an argument. This method returns an instance of the class, which we store in a clazz variable of type Class. Finally, we print the name of the class using its getName() method.

  • Class.forName() – loads the specified class and returns a reference of type Class< ?>. This method will throw a ClassNotFoundException if the class is not found.
  • Class – a generic class type used to hold a reference to a loaded class.
  • getName() – retrieves the fully qualified name of the class as a string.

Creating Instances and Using Class Methods

Now that we know how to get a class by its string name let’s see how to create an instance of the obtained class and interact with its methods and fields.

public class CreateInstanceFromString {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            String className = "java.util.ArrayList";
            Class<?> clazz = Class.forName(className);
            Object instance = clazz.getDeclaredConstructor().newInstance();
            Method addMethod = clazz.getMethod("add", Object.class);
            addMethod.invoke(instance, "Hello, world!");
            System.out.println("Instance: " + instance);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

In this example, we first get the class as before using Class.forName(). Next, we create an instance of the class using getDeclaredConstructor().newInstance(). Then, we get the “add” method from the class using getMethod() and invoke it on the instance using invoke() method with a string as an argument. Finally, we print the instance to see the result.

In conclusion, Java developers often encounter scenarios where they need to get a class from a string and work with its methods and fields during runtime. Using Java Reflection, developers can effectively handle these situations and create dynamic, adaptable code. With the knowledge of Reflection and the code examples provided in this article, you can confidently tackle the problem of getting a class by its string name.

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